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Beware of bogus request for readings!

June 23, 2014

telephoneI just had an interesting, cautionary experience, which I’d like to share with anyone who does readings via phone, skype, or email.

I got a request for a phone reading ASAP from someone who said he found me online (probably Craigslist). I made an appointment with him later in the evening, and he said he would send the PayPal payment as soon as he could. Bells went off in my head, though, so I decided to be careful about making sure that the payment came through first.

The time of the reading came up, and there was no sign of the payment on my PayPal account, but I did get an email saying that payment had been made … but the email was not from the same address that PayPal always uses, and my email account flagged it as suspicious. At the same time that the email came in, this guy called for his reading. I told him I had to call back in a few minutes. I waited to see if PayPal would show a payment, and it didn’t, so I called him back to tell him that there was a problem with his payment. He said he had not used his PayPal account in a long time and had gone to the site via a google search. So I told him that he may have hit a bogus PayPal imposter site, and he needed to contact his credit card company and PayPal, in case his financial information was compromised. He expressed concern, but didn’t seem as worried as I would have been in his shoes. He then offered to give me his credit card information instead to get a reading, but I declined.

I then googled his phone number and found the following evidence that this is a pattern of his. See the following link:

http://whoscall.in/1/4244429229/

As you can see, the fraud, it turns out, is not with a bogus internet site pretending to be PayPal (although that can probably happen too). Fortunately I was suspicious and did not do the reading for this person; others were not so lucky.

So if you get a reading request from the phone number noted in that first link (and the name on the bogus email was Joshua Masir, but that’s probably bogus too, and it seems other names have been used), don’t fall for it!

PS: Yes, I have notified both PayPal and gmail (the bogus email was a gmail account) of this incident.  If this happens to you, I suggest that you keep the bogus emails to forward them to those authorities for them to investigate.

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From → Readings

9 Comments
  1. Well spotted, James! Thank you for the heads-up on this type of fraud.

    Ali x

  2. Cynicism can be a good thing 🙂

  3. P Olsen permalink

    Thanks my fair haired spiritual brother…..

    He just tried with me. I shall shut him down.

    Blessings be upon your mighty house!

    Kastrion

  4. Thanks a lot for sharing this information, James!

  5. Donna permalink

    This is a good cautionary tale for all of us who use paypal. If only these people would use their powers for good instead of evil!

  6. He is still at it and contacted me as well. Now his name is Avi!

    • I figured he would not give up. Fanatics rarely do. That’s why I posted this — to alert others of this problem.

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