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The Tarot can empower you to create the future you want and transform your life by providing you with insights about yourself and the world around you.

Conversational Tarot — Ace of Swords

A while back, I described a way to initiate thought-provoking conversations using the messages of the cards.  A great way to facilitate this process is to use my Pithy Tarot app, which provides a quick little meaning along with a card. 

Ace of Swords -- Tarot of the MastersToday I drew the Ace of Swords and this pithy meaning:

“Consciousness is a singular for which there is no plural.” — Erwin Schrödinger

(For an expansion on this, see the original blog post: https://jamesricklef.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/pithy-ace-swords-3/)

The question that this pithy meaning suggested to me is this:
What is consciousness? Is consciousness defined by our thoughts, or is it something beyond the realm of our thoughts?

Here are some of my (ahem) thoughts about this:

First of all, people typically suffer the illusion that we think all our thoughts … that they come from our consciousness, that we are consciously creating them. But the truth is that our brains are constantly sending thoughts into our consciousness unbidden.  In the popular vernacular, our minds “wander” and we “daydream.” In fact, our brains are actually organic computers that are running all the time when we are awake (and when we are dreaming, too). But if our brains are computers, doesn’t that mean that we are basically robots?  I don’t think so. At least, I sure hope not. I believe that the trick is to realize the difference between the thoughts that come from our brain-computer and the awareness that comes from our eternal consciousness.

Of course, all this begs the question: “Is there a difference?” In other words, are our minds and consciousness merely the product of organic computers (i.e., our brains)? Although our brains may be incredibly complex, this could indicate that our thoughts and actions are deterministic.  I mean, if that’s all there is – just organic hardware, an operating system (sort of like our instincts and automatic mental functions), and software (what we’ve learned) – then our minds are indeed just like a computer and our actions are determined by that hardware and software, just as are those of a computer. In other words, in that case, we don’t have free will.  But what if we have a separate consciousness beyond (or “above”) all that, a consciousness which actually gives us free will—at least, to some extent?

Schrödinger’s quote above comes from the following lengthier one:

“Vedanta teaches that consciousness is singular, all happenings are played out in one universal consciousness, and there is no multiplicity of selves.”

What he meant is that it is an illusion that we are separate from one another.  Consider the analogy of a dream. When we dream, we think we are acting in a world populated by other people. There is an illusion that those other people have their own consciousness. In fact, it is an illusion that we (our dream-selves) have our own consciousness that is acting within that dream world. The reality is that there is a consciousness (our “real world” mind) above and beyond that of the population of the dream world.  Schrödinger says that the reality in which we live (or think we live) is like that. There is a higher consciousness that is “dreaming” our lives and those of everyone else–sort of like how Brahma is dreaming all of reality in Hindu cosmology.

You can see how this consideration of what our consciousness might be is a fascinating question—and even more so for the fact that most people never wonder about it. So I suggest that you think about the following questions, and discuss them with other people (or post your thoughts here on this blog post) —

  1. Do our thoughts define our consciousness, or should we consider that our thoughts travel a two-way street: from our brain-computers to our consciousness as well as the other way around?
  2. Is there a superseding consciousness of which all our “separate” consciousnesses are a part?
  3. If we don’t have a transcendent consciousness beyond our “organic computers” (brains), can we have free will?

I guarantee this will spark a very interesting discussion.

 

Pithy Tarot meanings — Four of Cups

Four of Cups from Tarot of the MastersFour of Cups
“Feelings come and go like clouds in a windy sky. Consciousness breathing is my anchor.” — Thich Nhat Hanh

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — Six of Wands

Six of Wands -- Tarot of the MastersSix of Wands:
Pick a path and take it—support is there for you once you do.

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — The Hanged Man

Hanged Man -- Tarot of the MastersThe Hanged Man
Let go.

Was that too pithy?  Okay.  How’s this:
Let go of hurt, guilt, anger, disappointment, envy, sadness, etc. Let go of anything that causes you suffering or holds you back.

This message of letting go is a vitally important part of this card’s meaning, but it is also a hard piece of advice for most of us. We think letting go means giving up material things, and, of course, it can mean that, but it also means letting go of “bad things.” Unfortunately, that too can be hard for us to do, but at least it’s not an onerous prospect, as giving up “things” seems to be, although that’s an illusion. More deeply, however, letting go means letting go of all attachment—attachment to everything. This doesn’t mean letting go of everything; it just means don’t let yourself be attached to anything.

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — Seven of Cups

Seven of Cups -- Tarot of the MastersSeven of Cups:
Your imagination can create so many things — imagine a better future for yourself and the world.

Imagination is powerful, but it can be for either good or bad. It’s up to you to choose, dream, and then act. To help express this pithy meaning for the Seven of Cups, I would also like to share this song with you: John Lennon’s Imagine.

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — The Death card

Death -- Tarot of the MastersThe Death card:
“Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.” — Napoleon Bonaparte

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — Ace of Swords

Ace of Swords -- Tarot of the Masters Ace of Swords:
“The most important transformation is one of consciousness.” — Mary K. Greer (From her workshop at the 2005 Los Angeles Tarot Symposium)

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — The Hermit

Hermit -- Tarot of the MastersThe Hermit:
“Detachment from worldly things does not mean that you should own nothing, but that nothing should own you.” — Ali ibn abi Talib

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

Pithy Tarot meanings — Two of Swords

https://jamesricklef.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/deck-creator-forum-sevenfold-mystery/Two of Swords:
When you argue with someone, make sure you’re both talking about the same thing, because sometimes you’re not.

Often when we argue, the problem we have in finding common ground—the reason we can’t even make sense of each other sometimes—is because we are talking about somewhat different things. We both think we’re talking about the same thing, but one of us is arguing about what she thinks we’re talking about, and the other is arguing about what he think we’re talking about. The two things have similarities, and they superficially seem like the same thing, but they aren’t. And so it might help to step back and ask, “What do you think I’m saying? What do you think my position here is?” You may be surprised by the answer. And you may be surprised that the argument will either dissipate or at least moderate.

Do you like these pithy Tarot meanings? Get the Pithy Tarot eBook or the FREE app that uses my pithy Tarot meanings. Also, LIKE my Pithy Tarot Facebook page!

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